That ol’ Tabula Rasa:
Future editions of
The Peal
depend on you
O
n display at the Will Rogers Muse-
um in southern California is a gilt-
edged book entitled:
What I Know
about the Gold Standard
by Will Rogers. A
little placard next to the tome reads: “All the
pages in this book are blank.”
So it goes with the second issue of
The
Peal
. An intrepid crew of volunteers has put
together this first issue. But from here on
out, it’s all of ours.
The fledgling editorial board has a few ideas
in mind for what we want
The Peal
to be:
• A place of connections
between alumni;
• A place where alums
can talk with each other;
• A place to share and promote
alumni-related news and events;
• A place to build a stronger
alumni network.
We all know
Chimes
. Like a good mar-
riage (some of us know about those, too)
The
Peal
will be intimately related to
Chimes
but
will have its own distinct identity.
Chimes
is a love letter TO SFTSers;
The
Peal
is a conversation AMONG
loved ones.
To realize this noble pur-
pose,
The Pea
l needs
YOU. Imagine meet-
ing a long-lost SFTS
classmate or friend
at a church potluck, or in the cheap seats
at Candlestick Park, or right in front of the
stage at the Fillmore, or at a quiet little wa-
tering hole somewhere in Marin … What
would be your conversational gambit? What
would be your most treasured SFTS memory
to share? What would you be most willing to
reveal about what’s going on with you these
days?
THAT’S what we want
to fill the pages of the next
issue of
The Peal
. We invite
you to send your
contributions to
SFTSAlum
Don’t be shy!
D
o you remember the
film “Up”? The film
follows curmudgeon
Carl Fredricksen — not to be
confused with look-alike Jack
Hodges — who attaches bal-
loons filled with helium to his
home until he and it are lifted
away on an exotic adventure.
Just like in the Pixar classic
“Up,” you really can lift your
house just using balloons.
The big question is, of course
— in addition to “Why in the
heck would I want to do that?”
— How many balloons would
you need?
blog/noveltyrealestate/balloons/
provides the definitive answer.
According to The Seattle
Times, the construction indus-
try estimates a house weighs:
• 200 pounds per square
foot for a singlelevel
home;
• 275 pounds per square
foot for a twolevel
home; and
• 350 pounds per square
foot for a threelevel
home
Thus, the following number
of helium balloons would be re-
quired to physically elevate:
• The White House:
2,976,470,589
• Empire State Building:
68,705,882,353
• Washington Monu-
ment: 15,058,823,529
Food for thought: How many
balloons would it take to lift
Montgomery Hall? Geneva
Hall? Scott Hall? Forget Oxtoby
— a strong gust of wind would
blow that one away…
Pixar Animation Studios and Walt Disney Pictures
Getting a
Lift from Life
A LITTLE FUN
FUTURE ISSUES
The Peal | San Francisco Theological Seminary Alumni Newsletter | Spring 2013
11
1...,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 12